1931 Rover 2-Liter

Summary

  • Year of manufacture 
    1931
  • Chassis number 
    9550
  • Lot number 
    614
  • Drive 
    LHD
  • Condition 
    Used
  • Number of seats 
    2
  • Location
  • Exterior colour 
    Other
  • Drivetrain 
    2wd
  • Fuel type 
    Petrol

Description

1931 Rover 2-Litre Saloon
Registration no. GO 1521
Chassis no. 9550

Already established as a maker of quality cycles, the Rover Company of Coventry diversified into car and motorcycle production in the early 1900s. Its first efforts were tri-cars, the first four-wheeled Rover appearing in 1904. The best-selling Rover in the immediate post-war years was the economy class twin-cylinder Eight. This was succeeded by the 9/20, a larger car with four-cylinder, water-cooled, overhead-valve engine, which in turn gave way to the 10/25 for 1928. The six-cylinder overhead-valve 2-Litre model first appeared in 1929 and was revamped for 1931, gaining a shorter chassis and the 10/25 body. An unusual feature was the cover arch built into the rear doors to protect the rear passengers' clothing. The 2-Litre shared its engine and running gear with the shorter-wheelbase Light Six ? the car that famously out-sped the 'Blue Train' from St Raphael to Paris. The 2-Litre would turn out to be a short-lived model, with only 1,255 completed when production ceased at the end of 1932. Survivors are rare.

The example offered here is believed by the Rover Sports Register to be the last short-chassis 2-Litre saloon in existence. 'GO 1521' comes with its original logbook recording seven owners, the last of whom, Terry Harrison of Mansfield, kept the Rover from 1974 until 2017 when it was purchased by the current vendor. Terry Harrison restored 'GO 1521' in the 1970s, zeroing the odometer, which currently reads 5,815 miles (see expired MoTs on file).

The vendor has mostly focused on re-commissioning the car, which previously had only been driven a minimal mileage annually (almost certainly to the MoT station and back). It has been serviced and repaired where necessary, which has included cleaning and fixed the sticking starter motor; flushing the radiator; changing the oil; fitting a new SU fuel pump; repairing the brake lights; replacing the battery; and fitting four new Blockley tyres. In addition, numerous fittings were replaced where the wood had dried out and the screws had become loose.

The vendor has covered around 650 miles in the year he has owned the Rover, mostly going to local shows where it has won a few awards. The accompanying history file contains some receipts from the 1970s; magazine articles about the model in general; most MoTs from 1974 to date; a V5C Registration Certificate; and the aforementioned logbook.