1966 Porsche 911

2.0 SWB

Summary

  • Year of manufacture 
    1966
  • Car type 
    Coupé
  • Chassis number 
    304392
  • Drive 
    LHD
  • Condition 
    Restored
  • Number of seats 
    2
  • Location
  • Exterior colour 
    Red
  • Drivetrain 
    2wd
  • Fuel type 
    Petrol

Description

French registration papers

- Completely restored
- Substantial file of bills and restoration documents
- Matching numbers

Presented in 1963 at the Frankfurt Motor Show, the 911 went on sale in 1964. The first version of what would become an automotive legend was fitted at the time with a type 901/01 engine, a six-cylinder aluminium unit developing 130 bhp and fed by six single-barrel Solex carburettors. With a capacity of 1991 cc and maximum torque of 174 Nm at 4200 rpm, it had a crankshaft with seven main bearings, making clear that it was designed to receive significant increases in power. The 911 was undoubtedly a tremendous road car, but it was of course on racetracks around the world that it made a name for itself, achieving an unrivalled record in competition. Several other versions were developed on the basis of this engine, including the appearance of the first 911 S, producing 160 bhp and fitted for the first time with Fuchs light alloy wheels. In 1969 came the transition to fuel injection and the adoption of a 2.2-litre engine, which was in turn bored out to 2.4 litres in 1972, with T , E and S variants developing respectively 130, 165 and 190 bhp. Initially produced in short-wheelbase (or SWB) form, from 1968 the 911 moved for good to the long-wheelbase chassis, intended to provide it with greater stability.

The model we are presenting here is a 130 bhp 911 2.0-litre which was delivered new in Sweden on 27 May 1966 through the Porsche importer Scania-Vabis. It has the chassis number 304392 and a type 901/05 engine, number 907608, fitted with triple-barrel Webers in place of the less effective Solex carburettors. From the period documents we can see that it was ordered by Kenneth Ljungberg, a resident of Trollhättan; our research indicates that he took part in the 6th round of the Swedish Sportscar Championship at the Dalsland circuit on 25 September 1966. After spending the first part of his life in Sweden, the car turned up in Germany, when its then owner, Herr Hirschberg, had it valued in 2001 by Peter Berliner in Hamburg. Later, in January 2008, the 911 was sold by the Mercedes dealership in the Austrian town of Hartberg to its new owner, Karl Ritter, the proprietor of a car museum at Stainz in Austria comprising nearly 200 classic cars. When the museum closed, the car made its way to Switzerland, before being sold in France in July 2014 to an industrialist from Normandy. At this point, it received its identification papers and certificate of authenticity issued by Porsche France; in 2015, it was sent to the workshop of a Porsche specialist in the Reims area to be given a full repaint in its original colour of Polo Red (Polorot 6602) and for the interior to be restored, strictly respecting the materials originally used. Following this, it was sold to its second French owner, a distinguished collector, who entrusted it to the expert Bernard Vara for a complete restoration of the engine and gearbox, carried out in ‘The Workshop’, the business run by Pierre Modas. The entire engine and gearbox assembly was removed to carry out a complete rebuild, as the substantial restoration file in our possession confirms. Numerous other parts subject to wear were also replaced by the Porsche dealership in Bayonne. In total, nearly 30,000 € was spent on the entire mechanical restoration between 2016 and 2018. With good documentation, ‘matching colours’ and ‘matching numbers’ (engine and gearbox), this 911 2.0L is a highly authentic example with a remarkable history which has undergone a complete restoration over the past 4 years.

This car will be sold by auction by AGUTTES Auction House, in Lyon, France, on November the 9th, 2019.
The digital catalog will is available on our website
https://www.aguttes.com/en/sale/96041
Please contact us for any further details.
By phone :
+33 437 242 423
+33 147 459 301
+33 668 362 622
By email :
[email protected]