1961 Jaguar MK II

Summary

  • Year of manufacture 
    1961
  • Chassis number 
    219866DN
  • Lot number 
    275
  • Condition 
    Used
  • Location
  • Exterior colour 
    Other

Description

Offered from The Alps to Goodwood Collection
1961 Jaguar Mk2 3.8-Litre Sports Saloon
Chassis no. 219866DN

The retrospectively titled Mark 1 - Jaguar's first unitary construction saloon - was replaced in October 1959 by the closely related, albeit extensively revised, Mark 2. Slimmer windscreen pillars and deeper side windows greatly enlarged the Mark 2's glass area, and the deletion of its predecessor's full-sized rear wheel spats allowed the rear track to be widened, a move which increased roll resistance and stability. Otherwise, the running gear remained much the same as before, with independent front suspension by wishbones and coil springs, leaf-sprung live rear axle, and Dunlop servo-assisted disc brakes (optional at first on the Mark 1 but standard from November 1957) on all four wheels. A redesigned dashboard with speedometer and rev-counter ahead of the driver and the six toggle switches and four minor gauges grouped centrally, established Jaguar's layout for years to come.

With the Mark 2's arrival, the 3.8-litre version of Jaguar's XK 'six' became available for the first time in the company's medium-sized saloon. This engine, used previously in the Mark IX saloon, produced 220bhp at 5,500rpm. In this, its final and most desirable form, the Jaguar Mark 2 provided the discerning, enthusiast driver with one of the finest sports saloons available in the 1960s. Transmission options were a four-speed manual (with or without overdrive) or a Borg-Warner automatic gearbox, an improved all-synchromesh version of the former being specified from 1965. In its ultimate, 3.8-litre, overdrive-equipped specification, the Mark 2 could reach 125mph with 60mph coming up in 8.5 seconds, impressive figures for a saloon of its size even by today's standards.
Manufactured on 21st December 1961, this left-hand drive Mark 2 was delivered new to the famous German Jaguar dealer Peter Lindner in Frankfurt and sold in 1962 to Joachim Pfeifer of Eisdorf, Germany. The car then had four further owners in Germany: Gerhard Schaefer of Niederau (1969); Irene Miller of Lich-Steinstrasse (1969); Heinz Uwe Adrian of Hürtgenwald-Strass (1971); and Peter Pompluss of Hürtgenwald (1977).

Circa 2004 the Jaguar went to Switzerland where it was owned first by Martin Glanzmann of Oberhasli and then by Jean-Pierre Müller of Männedorf from 2007. The current vendor bought the car in 2009. In 2010 the Jaguar was restored by the respected specialists JD Classics at a cost of £123,528. This body off rebuild include various sensible upgrades including power steering, heated windows, central locking, etc. Since then the car has been serviced in Switzerland by specialists Dönni. It should be noted that the engine has been changed.

Should the vehicle remain in the UK, local import taxes of 5% will be added to the hammer price.