Ferrari Supercars: The Prancing Horse gets hyper

Ferrari Supercars: The Prancing Horse gets hyper

Not long to go now (we believe) until Ferrari’s latest supercar-to-end-all-others is revealed to the public. The ‘F70’, as it is generally referred to, is the latest in a line of Ferrari ‘hypercars’. Classic Driver looks at some of the others, from the 288 GTO to the Enzo.

Ferrari 288 GTO

Ferrari Supercars: The Prancing Horse gets hyper
Ferrari Supercars: The Prancing Horse gets hyperFerrari Supercars: The Prancing Horse gets hyper

Although outwardly similar to the regular-production 308 GTB series, the 288 GTO was an altogether different animal. First of all, the mid-mounted V8 was mounted longitudinally, not laterally. Secondly, twin turbochargers boosted power to around 400bhp. In addition, a longer wheelbase, bigger wheels/tyres and improved brakes gave the whole package – originally intended as a homologation special, hence the ‘O’ for omologato – colossal performance. A top speed of over 300km/h set the standard in the early 80s. With production limited to under three hundred cars, the 288 GTO is now highly sought-after.

to car listing in the Classic Driver Marketplace >>

Ferrari F40

Ferrari Supercars: The Prancing Horse gets hyper
Ferrari Supercars: The Prancing Horse gets hyperFerrari Supercars: The Prancing Horse gets hyper

With its F40 (‘40’ celebrating the 40th anniversary of the company in 1987), Ferrari took the basic concept of the 288 GTO, upped the performance and clothed it in all-new, aerodynamically influenced bodywork. It was the last supercar to be commissioned by Enzo Ferrari before his death in August 1988. The 470bhp+ supercar that resulted is still considered to be one of the finest, most visceral supercars ever constructed.

to car listing in the Classic Driver Marketplace >>

Ferrari F50

Ferrari Supercars: The Prancing Horse gets hyper
Ferrari Supercars: The Prancing Horse gets hyperFerrari Supercars: The Prancing Horse gets hyper

With its suspension and engine points all bolted directly to a stiff chassis tub, the F50 (introduced in 1995 to celebrate the company’s 50th anniversary) was a vehicle meant to give owners the closest possible experience to driving an actual GP car. The 4.7-litre V12 produced over 500bhp, moving the bar ever higher in terms of mid-engined Ferrari performance.

to car listing in the Classic Driver Marketplace >>

Ferrari Enzo

Ferrari Supercars: The Prancing Horse gets hyper
Ferrari Supercars: The Prancing Horse gets hyperFerrari Supercars: The Prancing Horse gets hyper

Having achieved both critical acclaim from the press and market success with the 288 GTO, F40 and F50, Ferrari chose to produce another ‘ultimate’ supercar to commemorate not only the new millennium but also the company’s founder. Incorporating much F1-derived engineering (CCM brakes, variable valve-timing, pushrod coil-over dampers and ‘paddle’ gearshift), the Enzo - the last Ferrari 'hypercar' produced to date - vied with McLaren’s F1 as the ‘world’s fastest’ car. Over a racing circuit, it would trump anything, the road version of the F1 included. For presence and towering, race-bred performance, the Enzo has few equals.

to car listing in the Classic Driver Marketplace >>

Ferrari 'F70'

Ferrari Supercars: The Prancing Horse gets hyper

What do we know about the car that’s likely to be the ‘must-have’ in any self-respecting Ferrari collector’s garage? It’s understood to be a hybrid, with extra bursts of up to 120bhp available on demand from its F1-derived ‘HY-KERS’ electric motor system. That’s in addition to the likely 800bhp or so pushed out by its big V12. With 900+bhp, aerodynamic lessons learned from the FXX programme and low weight, the F70 will be sensationally fast, desirable and dramatic-looking.

In other words, a worthy successor to the title ‘Ferrari Hypercar’.

Related Links

Ferrari supercars of all generations can be seen in the Classic Driver Marketplace



Text: Classic Driver
Photos: Classic Driver Dealer / Ferrari