1982 VW Golf

GTI Oettinger

Zusammenfassung

  • Baujahr 
    1982
  • Automobiltyp 
    Coupé
  • Chassisnummer 
    WVWZZZ17ZCW322249
  • Losnummer 
    103
  • Lenkung 
    Links
  • Zustand 
    Restauriert
  • Innenfarbe 
    Sonstige
  • Zahl der Sitze 
    4
  • Standort
  • Außenfarbe 
    Grau
  • Getriebe 
    Schaltgetriebe
  • Antrieb 
    Zweirad
  • Kraftstoff 
    Benzin

Beschreibung

French registration papers

- Only 1250 cars built
- A genuine sports car
- Correct, original specification

In the mid-1970s, the fashion for large, powerful sports cars which drank too much fuel seemed to be on the wane. The car manufacturers therefore needed to adapt their offering, and Volkswagen would be one of the first to propose a new approach to sports cars. A major attraction at the Frankfurt Motor Show in 1975, the Golf GTI 1.6 was launched on the market billed as “The quickest Volkswagen ever”. But little did the German manufacturer imagine that it had created the benchmark for its category. Light (just 810kg/1786lb) and peppy, with its four-cylinder engine producing 110bhp, Volkswagen’s GTI hit hard and gave some ideas not only to its competitors, but also to independent tuners. Against all expectations, Volkswagen France, in partnership with the German wizard Oettinger, presented – right under the nose of its parent company – a limited edition of the Golf GTI 1.6, of which just 1250 units would be built, all for the French market. In terms of its mechanical specification, it was distinguished by its 16-valve head, twin overhead camshafts (compared with one on the standard model) and power output of 136bhp. Thanks to its exceptional chassis, it could easily rival more powerful cars on twisty roads. Back in 1981, the craze for tuning was starting to take hold in France. From an aesthetic point of view, there were considerable changes, and with the fitment of a BBS kit (then much in vogue), the Golf GTI Oettinger sported wheelarch extensions and a unique front spoiler. ‘GTI 16S’ (for 16-valve) badges were proudly applied on the body and inside the car, while 14-inch ATS alloy wheels rounded off the specific features of this limited edition.
The model we are presenting for sale was first registered on 16 April 1982. Finished in anthracite grey, it is in excellent overall condition to its correct original specification. Acquired by its current owner in 2009, it underwent a painstaking restoration, with comprehensive work to its bodywork and mechanical components. The engine was completely overhauled in 2017 at the Phega Sport garage by M. Houel, a recognised specialist in the Golf GTI Oettinger. More than €6,000 was spent to overhaul the engine, which is still running in. The body was entirely repainted and the ATS wheels completely refurbished by the Laubscher garage in Switzerland. Only the interior has been left in its original state, but it has nonetheless remained well preserved. This model with its safe, dynamic handling, which is difficult to find in its original specification, remains an icon of the Eighties. It undoubtedly represents a rare opportunity to own a motoring legend whose value should increase in the years to come.

35,000 € / 45,000 €
1982 – Volkswagen Golf GTI Oettinger

French registration papers
Chassis number WVWZZZ17ZCW322249
Engine: four-cylinder – 1588cc – 136bhp

- Only 1250 cars built
- A genuine sports car
- Correct, original specification

In the mid-1970s, the fashion for large, powerful sports cars which drank too much fuel seemed to be on the wane. The car manufacturers therefore needed to adapt their offering, and Volkswagen would be one of the first to propose a new approach to sports cars. A major attraction at the Frankfurt Motor Show in 1975, the Golf GTI 1.6 was launched on the market billed as “The quickest Volkswagen ever”. But little did the German manufacturer imagine that it had created the benchmark for its category. Light (just 810kg/1786lb) and peppy, with its four-cylinder engine producing 110bhp, Volkswagen’s GTI hit hard and gave some ideas not only to its competitors, but also to independent tuners. Against all expectations, Volkswagen France, in partnership with the German wizard Oettinger, presented – right under the nose of its parent company – a limited edition of the Golf GTI 1.6, of which just 1250 units would be built, all for the French market. In terms of its mechanical specification, it was distinguished by its 16-valve head, twin overhead camshafts (compared with one on the standard model) and power output of 136bhp. Thanks to its exceptional chassis, it could easily rival more powerful cars on twisty roads. Back in 1981, the craze for tuning was starting to take hold in France. From an aesthetic point of view, there were considerable changes, and with the fitment of a BBS kit (then much in vogue), the Golf GTI Oettinger sported wheelarch extensions and a unique front spoiler. ‘GTI 16S’ (for 16-valve) badges were proudly applied on the body and inside the car, while 14-inch ATS alloy wheels rounded off the specific features of this limited edition.
The model we are presenting for sale was first registered on 16 April 1982. Finished in anthracite grey, it is in excellent overall condition to its correct original specification. Acquired by its current owner in 2009, it underwent a painstaking restoration, with comprehensive work to its bodywork and mechanical components. The engine was completely overhauled in 2017 at the Phega Sport garage by M. Houel, a recognised specialist in the Golf GTI Oettinger. More than €6,000 was spent to overhaul the engine, which is still running in. The body was entirely repainted and the ATS wheels completely refurbished by the Laubscher garage in Switzerland. Only the interior has been left in its original state, but it has nonetheless remained well preserved. This model with its safe, dynamic handling, which is difficult to find in its original specification, remains an icon of the Eighties. It undoubtedly represents a rare opportunity to own a motoring legend whose value should increase in the years to come.

35,000 € / 45,000 €
1982 – Volkswagen Golf GTI Oettinger

French registration papers
Chassis number WVWZZZ17ZCW322249
Engine: four-cylinder – 1588cc – 136bhp

- Only 1250 cars built
- A genuine sports car
- Correct, original specification

In the mid-1970s, the fashion for large, powerful sports cars which drank too much fuel seemed to be on the wane. The car manufacturers therefore needed to adapt their offering, and Volkswagen would be one of the first to propose a new approach to sports cars. A major attraction at the Frankfurt Motor Show in 1975, the Golf GTI 1.6 was launched on the market billed as “The quickest Volkswagen ever”. But little did the German manufacturer imagine that it had created the benchmark for its category. Light (just 810kg/1786lb) and peppy, with its four-cylinder engine producing 110bhp, Volkswagen’s GTI hit hard and gave some ideas not only to its competitors, but also to independent tuners. Against all expectations, Volkswagen France, in partnership with the German wizard Oettinger, presented – right under the nose of its parent company – a limited edition of the Golf GTI 1.6, of which just 1250 units would be built, all for the French market. In terms of its mechanical specification, it was distinguished by its 16-valve head, twin overhead camshafts (compared with one on the standard model) and power output of 136bhp. Thanks to its exceptional chassis, it could easily rival more powerful cars on twisty roads. Back in 1981, the craze for tuning was starting to take hold in France. From an aesthetic point of view, there were considerable changes, and with the fitment of a BBS kit (then much in vogue), the Golf GTI Oettinger sported wheelarch extensions and a unique front spoiler. ‘GTI 16S’ (for 16-valve) badges were proudly applied on the body and inside the car, while 14-inch ATS alloy wheels rounded off the specific features of this limited edition.
The model we are presenting for sale was first registered on 16 April 1982. Finished in anthracite grey, it is in excellent overall condition to its correct original specification. Acquired by its current owner in 2009, it underwent a painstaking restoration, with comprehensive work to its bodywork and mechanical components. The engine was completely overhauled in 2017 at the Phega Sport garage by M. Houel, a recognised specialist in the Golf GTI Oettinger. More than €6,000 was spent to overhaul the engine, which is still running in. The body was entirely repainted and the ATS wheels completely refurbished by the Laubscher garage in Switzerland. Only the interior has been left in its original state, but it has nonetheless remained well preserved. This model with its safe, dynamic handling, which is difficult to find in its original specification, remains an icon of the Eighties. It undoubtedly represents a rare opportunity to own a motoring legend whose value should increase in the years to come.