1966 Shelby GT 350

Fastback

Zusammenfassung

  • Baujahr 
    1966
  • Chassisnummer 
    SFM6S2214
  • Lenkung 
    Links
  • Zustand 
    Gebraucht
  • Innenfarbe 
    Sonstige
  • Standort
  • Außenfarbe 
    Sonstige
  • Kraftstoff 
    Benzin

Beschreibung

To be OFFERED AT AUCTION at Auctions America’s Fort Lauderdale event, April 1-3, 2016.

Chassis No.
SFM6S2214

Estimate:
$150,000 - $175,000 US

While Ford's 1964 Mustang was a massive success, it would never be mistaken as the epitome of "Total Performance", especially since this pony was based on Ford's old economy car; the Falcon. Cue Carroll Shelby; already a Ford-related performance commodity with his 260- and 289-cid Cobras, was tapped to transform the mild-mannered Mustang into a potential "B" Production SCCA Racer. Unveiled by Shelby on January 27, 1965, the Shelby GT 350 had a few subtle exterior changes. The street GT 350s of 1965 sold rapidly, but since they were fundamentally thinly disguised racecars, early buyers complained about harshness, noise and rattles. As a result, the 1966 GT 350 became more user-friendly due to a host of mechanical revisions that softened the edges and made the car more amenable.

When you looked into the details of the package, it was still mighty impressive and the two-place fastback coupe offered amongst its equipment: Shelby American prepared 289-cid, 306-hp OHV Cobra V-8 engine set up with a special high riser aluminum manifold; center pivot float Holley four-barrel carburetor; specially designed hand-built tubular “tuned” exhaust system featuring straight through glass-packed mufflers; finned Cobra aluminum valve covers; extra capacity finned and baffled aluminum oil pan; fully synchronized Borg Warner special “Sebring” close ratio four-speed manual transmission with lightweight all-alloy case; computer designed competition suspension geometry; one inch diameter front anti-roll bar; fully stabilized, torque controlled rear axle equipped with “No-Spin” limited slip differential; Kelsey-Hayes front disc brakes with ventilated disc and special full competition pads; wide drum rear brakes with metallic linings; Koni adjustable shock absorbers; trunk-mounted battery for optimum weight distribution; light weight fiberglass hood with integrally-designed functional air scoop; all black interior with bucket-type seats and Shelby approved competition “quick release” seatbelts; special instrument cluster with tachometer and oil pressure gauge in addition to speedometer, fuel gauge and water temperature gauge; two-speed electric windshield wipers and washers; wood-rim racing-style steering wheel; 19:1 quick-ratio steering; spare wheel cover; heater and 350 competition side stripes all for the reasonable price of $4,547. If you wanted the 10-spoke Shelby aluminum wheels such as seen on this car, it would set you back an additional $273. All told, 1,356 cars were built in addition to 999 GT 350H Hertz “Rent-A-Racers,” five prototypes, ten with Paxton superchargers, four drag cars and four Convertibles for a total of 2,378 Shelby cars during the course of 1966.

According to the 2011 Fourth Edition of the 1965-1966-1967 Shelby Registry this particular car (6S2214) was finished in Sapphire Blue, and it continues to be presented in this rare-for Shelby color with Wimbledon White stripes. Sapphire Blue was not a 1966 Mustang color, but was part of the Ford family by being a color choice for 1966 Continentals and Thunderbirds and a solid color choice by the Shelby American team. The car was shipped to Carter Auto Transport in Newark, New Jersey with an order date of July 20, 1966. On the following day it was shipped to Gilboy Ford-Mercury, Inc. in Allentown, Pennsylvania where they were invoiced $3,547 plus $214 for the Shelby 10-spoke aluminum wheels, $45.45 for the AM radio, $40 for the fold-down rear seat and $89.60 freight for a total of $3,936.05. The GT 350 was purchased by original owner, Louis Guglielmo of Downingtown, Pennsylvania on an unspecified date. The Registry shows five known subsequent owners, including the current custodian who has owned the Shelby for nearly 10 years.

At one point when the car was offered for sale in 2005, the car is stated to have been “fully restored.” The then-current owner had it sent to Legendary Motor Car Co. and we are told that the car “has an older cosmetic restoration that is backed by a fresh drivetrain restoration” and that it remains in “prize winning condition.” The 289-cid, 306-hp Hi-Po V-8 was fully rebuilt during the process. The stylish and sporty 10-spoke aluminum Shelby wheels are original with Goodyear Blue Streak tires as the rubber of choice. The Shelby has a heater, three-inch lap belts, Koni shocks - plus the car is touted for being in dry climates since new and has remained rust-free.

This is regarded as a very rare color combination for this legendary car; it is reported to run and drive in excellent form with an excellent interior making it all the better for fantastic touring adventures or applying its value as a show car.

Carroll Shelby is remembered for his farm boy outfits and big black hat that cropped up everywhere from Le Mans to Riverside. On tortuous racing circuits around the world, Shelby learned what a car should be….power and handling when you need it. You don’t have to go from zero to sixty in 5.7-seconds, but it is nice to know that you can.
1966 Shelby GT 350 Fastback