1963 Aston Martin DB5

Concours Restored – Completion December 2019. A Unique and Important Aston Martin back on the road after 51 Years

Summary

  • Year of manufacture 
    1963
  • Mileage 
    33 927 mi / 54 601 km
  • Car type 
    Saloon
  • Drive 
    RHD
  • Condition 
    Restored
  • Exterior brand colour 
    Silver Birch
  • Metallic 
    Yes
  • Interior colour 
    Black
  • Interior brand colour 
    VM 8500
  • Interior type 
    Leather
  • Number of doors 
    2
  • Number of seats 
    4
  • Location
  • Exterior colour 
    Silver
  • Gearbox 
    Manual
  • Drivetrain 
    2wd
  • Fuel type 
    Petrol

Description

1963 Aston Martin DB5
Concours Restored – Completion December 2019
Retaining its Original Matching-Numbers Engine & Gearbox
Documented with Factory Build Sheet & AMHT Inspection to Confirm Original 33,927 miles
A Unique and Important Aston Martin Back on the Road after 51 Years

Not merely the best-known model produced by Aston Martin, the DB5 saloon is generally regarded as one of the most famous automobiles ever built by the marque. Introduced at the 1963 Earls Court Motor Show, the DB5 was an obvious extension of the DB4, featuring similar Touring-designed coachwork and an enlarged 4-litre update of Tadek Marek’s race-engineered aluminium engine. Aston Martin landed one of history’s most famous marketing coups when the DB5 was chosen as James Bond’s transport for the 1965 film Goldfinger. With a modest production of 1,021 examples, the DB5 has evolved into the marque’s most timeless classic, appealing to dedicated enthusiasts and casual observers alike.

This incredible DB5 was supplied new to Eton Garage Ltd as a demonstration vehicle. The subsequent owner used the car up until 1968 when the car developed a head gasket leak. It was then parked on the side of his drive and the owner bought another car for daily use. The original and last known tax disc is still with the car and expired September 1968. The speedometer shows 33,853 miles which is believed to be genuine considering the last date the car was used. In 1980, it was sold and later sent to Starley’s garage in Sussex, still covered in green moss from sitting out in the open for so many years. The garage cleaned the car to reveal a Fiesta Red paint finish as per the factory build sheet.

Work was started to restore the car but the owner soon ran in to financial difficulties and the car was left to the garage in final settlement and thus passed into their ownership. It was put into store in the corner of the workshop and never moved. Mr Starley passed away and the garage was locked up for around 20 years containing nearly 30 classic cars and the DB5 was one of them. The wife of the late Mr Starley and her son, Hurricane Starley, sold the car in 2010 to an Aston Martin marque specialist where it remained in storage until commencement of the restoration in early 2018. Mr Starley, incidentally, was a WWII pilot (He named his son Hurricane) and his Grandfather invented the Penny Farthing, amongst other things. The history file contains letters from the Starley family to verify the car’s history and photographs showing the car in storage up to the restoration process revealing the aluminium bodywork, unseen and undamaged in 55 years.

Upon commencement of the restoration we were amazed to find that every panel on the car was original. The only sign of a previous minor repair was to the offside rear wing. Great effort was made to replace as little new aluminium as possible to the area to retain its originality. Even the original door skins remain over new frames. The front bonnet and boot lid still have the chassis number written on them and according to our restorers, this car is an unprecedented find.

AMHT were invited to inspect and report on the car and in their words; “The car has been off the road since September 1968 and despite shortcomings in its storage arrangements, it has survived remarkably well. Panels show complete originality and have not been removed.” The report confirms the authenticity of the car and there are numerous photographs showing factory numbered components around the car.

Marque specialists, Pugsley & Lewis, have just completed the ground up 2-year restoration of the DB5 and it has been finished in the handsome combination of Silver Birch with black hide. The speedometer has been rebuilt showing the correct mileage reading and every original component has been retained where possible. The rebuilt engine retains its original 3,995 cc capacity.

The car will retain its 5515 PP registration number with the original 1968 tax disc displayed in the windscreen. This is a truly remarkable car, in every sense and surely one that will be viewed as the most authentic DB5 ever to go on sale.

To discuss in further detail please contact Paul Giovanni at Sports Classics London.