Zusammenfassung

  • Baujahr 
    1963
  • Chassisnummer 
    124333
  • Motornummer 
    PO 800647
  • Losnummer 
    2
  • Lenkung 
    Links
  • Zustand 
    Gebraucht
  • Zahl der Sitze 
    2
  • Standort
  • Außenfarbe 
    Sonstige
  • Antrieb 
    Zweirad
  • Kraftstoff 
    Benzin

Beschreibung

Property of a deceased's estate
1963 Porsche 356B Super 90 Coupé Project
Registration no. 122 GWJ
Chassis no. 124333
Engine no. PO 800647

One of the all-time great sports cars, the 356 was the work of Ferry Porsche, who had been inspired by the FIAT-based Cisitalias of Piero Dusio. Ferry's 356 was based on the Volkswagen designed by his father, and like the immortal 'Beetle' employed a platform-type chassis with rear-mounted air-cooled engine and all-independent torsion bar suspension. Introduced in 1948, the Porsche 356 set a new standard for small sports cars and proved adaptable to all forms of motor sport including circuit racing and rallying.

By the time the 356B arrived in 1959, the engine - now standardised at 1,600cc - was available in three different stages of tune, the most powerful - apart from the four-cam Carrera - being the 90bhp unit of the Super 90. The 356B represents significant advances in driveability and comfort over earlier 356 models, and is a pleasingly quick way to enjoy the traditional Porsche values of quality, reliability and mechanical robustness.

A late T-6 twin-grille model, this Porsche 356B Super 90 was supplied new on 27th July 1963 by Hoffmans of Sheffield Ltd to local resident Ms Pauline West, who kept it until September 1967. In January 1968 the car was sold by Sylvester Service Station in Sheffield to John Richard, from whom the now deceased owner purchased it in January 1971. '122 GWJ' was driven into the garage and parked by its late owner in 1973. The mileage recorded at the last MoT test in '73 was 87,080 and the current odometer reading is 91,588 miles.

Originally ivory, the Porsche was re-sprayed at some time but the paint is now in poor condition, with micro blistering and peeling in places. Apart from rotten sills and rusted wheelarches, the body appears generally solid and the doors open and shut, as does the bonnet and boot. The front screen is cracked and the black vinyl interior is mouldy but complete and saveable, while all instruments are in place. The engine is seized but again all components are present. It should be noted that the brake shoes have been backed off completely from the finned aluminium drums for ease of movement. Sold strictly as viewed, the car comes with an old-style buff logbook, expired MoT (1973) and old insurance papers. A potentially most rewarding project for the Porsche enthusiast.