1954 Jaguar XK 120

Zusammenfassung

  • Baujahr 
    1954
  • Automobiltyp 
    Sonstige
  • Chassisnummer 
    667076
  • Motornummer 
    W9888/8
  • Losnummer 
    414
  • Lenkung 
    Rechts
  • Zustand 
    Gebraucht
  • Markenfarbe außen 
    British Racing Green
  • Markenfarbe innen 
    Suede Green
  • Zahl der Sitze 
    2
  • Standort
  • Außenfarbe 
    Sonstige
  • Getriebe 
    Schaltgetriebe
  • Antrieb 
    Zweirad
  • Kraftstoff 
    Benzin

Beschreibung

Guide price: ??75000 - ??85000.  
- UK-supplied, right-hand drive, factory colour scheme, restored to a very high standard
- Excellent condition accompanied by a fully documented history folder. Jaguar Heritage Certificate
- Delightfully presented in British Racing Green, over Suede Green with a black hood
- On-the-button with subtle upgrades for reliability and well maintained over the years
- With an interesting history from new. Rarely do examples of this quality come to market
 According to its Jaguar Heritage Certificate, MTM 424 was an XK120 Drophead Coupe finished in British Racing Green with a suede green interior and a black hood. One of just 295 right-hand drive, home market cars it was manufactured in October 1953, first registered in January the following year, and supplied new by Henlys of London to Squadron Leader Desmond de Villiers of Hertford. ‘Dizzy' de Villiers AFC was the Chief Test Pilot at the De Havilland Aircraft Company, the world’s first open cockpit pilot to reach supersonic speed (albeit inadvertently, the cockpit canopy flew off mid-flight), the second British pilot to exceed Mach 2, Chief Experimental Test Pilot on the English Electric Lightning programme (making more than 1,000 flights), and who, during his test career, flew more than 6,000 hours in 130 different aircraft types. It's hard to believe these days, but during the Fifties and early Sixties, test pilots were seen as exceedingly glamorous and the majority were household names.Ownership of the car subsequently changed to NJ Hart of Weston-super-Mare before being acquired by Cedric Thomas in 1972, also of Weston. Mr Thomas, a retired professional automotive engineer, purchased the XK as a project to keep him occupied in his retirement years. Something of a perfectionist, the project would soon become, what could only be described as an obsession, with a money-no-object restoration over a 30-year period, and the result is simply spectacular. The car was totally stripped to single components before being either restored or renewed and carefully reassembled to mostly original specification. The engine was removed and fully rebuilt using new pistons, bearings and timing chains etc. Suspension components were stripped and rebuilt as was the gearbox and back axle. Documents within the car's history file confirm that the bodywork restoration was entrusted to specialist Bill Lawrence. Panels were replaced only when absolutely necessary, the rear wings were sourced by RS Panels of Nuneaton, with the rest of the bodywork prepared and built up by lead loading in the old-fashioned way. This can be a fairly laborious task but the results are worth it particularly when the car is treated to a number of coats of its original British Racing Green in traditional cellulose as here. Modern finishes have lots of advantages but it's difficult to replicate the sheer depth of gloss afforded by cellulose paint particularly when applied by a skilled craftsman. Equally, the Chromework was refinished by the very best in the business and is exceptional. The retrimming of the car's interior was entrusted to Nick Turley of Suffolk & Turley fame and has been completed to the very high standard you would expect with all the cockpit woodwork veneers superbly refinished, rebuilt seating in Suede Geen leather, new carpets and a new canvas hood with the correct inner lining.The Jaguar received further attention in 2008 when, according to documents within the file, a second engine rebuild was carried out by marque specialist VSE including a rear main seal update. Further updates to improve driveability and reliability include an alloy radiator, electric cooling fan, and uprated Koni shock absorbers. Today the 120 still presents beautifully and, according to our vendor, performs well. It starts on-the-button and the engine sounds keen and healthy. A home market Drophead Coupe in its original timeless colour combination, fastidiously restored with a known history, is regarded by many as the most desirable variant to own. I might be an old romantic but I find it difficult to look at this classic XK without conjuring up an image of the car on a sunny afternoon in 1958 rolling to a halt, top down, on the apron at Farnborough, an immaculate young Squadron Leader jumping out, putting on his white flying suit, climbing the metal ladder to the cockpit of his English Electric Lightning, throwing a match into the twin Avons, climbing to 20,000ft in less than a minute, wowing the crowd with a fearless display, jumping back into MTM 424, and returning home in time for tea. Magic.