1973 Ferrari 246 'Dino'

GTS

Zusammenfassung

  • Baujahr 
    1973
  • Kilometerstand 
    61 337 km / 38 114 mi
  • Automobiltyp 
    Targa
  • Chassisnummer 
    #07048
  • Motornummer 
    #0011346
  • Elektrische Fensterheber
    Ja
  • Lenkung 
    Links
  • Zustand 
    Restauriert
  • Markenfarbe außen 
    Argento Auteuil
  • Innenfarbe 
    Schwarz
  • Markenfarbe innen 
    Nero
  • Anzahl der Türen 
    2
  • Zahl der Sitze 
    2
  • Standort
  • Außenfarbe 
    Silber
  • Getriebe 
    Schaltgetriebe
  • Antrieb 
    Zweirad
  • Kraftstoff 
    Benzin

Beschreibung

The Dino was named in honour of Il Commendatore’s beloved late son, Alfredo, affectionately known as Alfredino. The Dino name had been seen on Ferrari racing engines as early as 1956, as well as a number of highly successful sports racers throughout the 1960’s.

It was, however, the sensational sports road-car bearing the distinctive script that really gave the Dino name the Worldwide recognition it deserved. Building on experiences gained with its successful Dino 206 S sports-racer of 1966, the curvaceous and sexy Dino 206 GT was launched at the Turin Motor Show in 1967. Ferrari retained the race car’s mid-engine layout for the road car but installed the power unit transversely rather than longitudinally. Penned by Pininfarina, built in aluminium by Scaglietti and powered by a 2.0 litre V6 Dino engine - the world had never seen such a pretty motor car! Ferrari sold three models under its Dino marque, the 206 GT, 246 GT and 246 GTS between 1967 and 1974 and following the 206 GT, the new 246 Dino GT was unveiled at the Turin Motor Show in 1969. Looks were almost identical to the 206 GT (why mess with perfection?), although the wheelbase was, in fact, slightly increased. Now powered by a 2.4 litre V6 Dino engine, performance was greatly improved with close to 200 brake horsepower. Built by Scaglietti, the body was now steel and the cylinder block cast-iron rather than aluminium, but the bigger engine's increased power gave it exhilarating performance with precise, balanced handling characteristics: “The Dino's cornering limits are very high..." said Road & Track. In 1972 Ferrari uncovered the 246 Dino GTS, with its easily removable lightweight hardtop, a fine example of which is offered here.

As one of only 401 left hand drive, European GTS versions, this is a relatively rare Dino specification. Delivered new in Italy to a lady owner who sold it after 4 years. The second owner, an Italian gentleman, kept the car for almost 40 years until 2015 when it was acquired by its present owner, an art dealer, who wanted to find the very best Dino GTS available and make it better. And that’s just what he did. As a low mileage example, he wanted to preserve the car in its highly original condition. The seats had been recovered in leather, as is often the case with Dinos, so he engaged Ferrari upholstery specialists, Tappezzeria Luppi in Modena, to re-cover the seats in the period correct vinyl. The rest of the interior, including the important “mousehair” dash-top covering, remains largely original. Mechanically the car was fully overhauled by Francorchamps’ Motors in Brussels in 2017 and the Ferrari Classiche red book certification was awarded confirming that all mechanical components remain original to the car. Stylishly finished in its original colour combination of Argento Auteuil with Nero trim it comes with original manuals, wallet & tools. This is an exceptionally sharp and correct Dino 246 GTS.

The Dino has a classically Italian laid back driving position, it has adequate legroom to accommodate taller drivers, and with outstretched arms lightly gripping the thin leather wheel and the classic Ferrari gear-lever gate close at hand the view through the steeply raked screen over the rounded front arches is exquisite and exciting - you could easily imagine that you’re Jean Guichet in the Dino 206 S on the Targa Florio.

This rare European delivered Dino 246 GTS is an exceptionally original, sharp and beautiful example – the wife or girlfriend will approve! Oh, so pretty!

Photos: Tim Scott