1962 BSA Bikes Rocket Gold Star

Summary

  • Baujahr 
    1962
  • Motorradtyp 
    Straßenmaschine
  • Motornummer 
    DA10R 7195
  • Losnummer 
    231
  • Zustand 
    Gebraucht
  • Farbe 
    Sonstige
  • Standort

Beschreibung

1962 BSA 646cc Rocket Gold Star Replica
Registration no. 668 VMB
Frame no. GA10 245
Engine no. DA10R 7195

• RRT2 gearbox
• Alloy rims
• 190mm Front brake
• Iconic styling
• Lucas Competition magneto

Although there were bicycle-related creations dating back several years before, BSA are considered to have started motorcycle production in 1910, for the 1911 model year. Destined never to have the racing pedigree of contemporaries prior to World War II, they nevertheless garnered a well-deserved reputation as a solid, dependable means of transport for many enthusiasts. After the Second World War, building on the strength of their war work, they improved their performances both on the racetrack, and in off-road events. Much of this sporting success can be attributed to one model – the Gold Star. Introduced shortly prior to the Second World War, its existence was cut short by the hostilities, and did not reappear again until 1949. From its resurrection it built its reputation as a competent all-rounder in sporting events of all types. It continued throughout the nineteen fifties, almost without rival except for (much more expensive) factory exotica. The secret of its success was not only its all-round performance, but also its accessibility to the average man.

By 1961 its popularity was starting to wane, but there was still to be one last hurrah. The Rocket Gold Star was introduced in 1962, running through only to 1963, which was also to be the final year for the A10 and the Goldie single. Accounts vary as to the genesis of the model, and range from a suggestion to the factory by Eddie Dow, to it being a 'parts bin special' intended to use up stocks of Gold Star and A10 parts. Whatever the truth, the model only sold around 1,500 examples before it was discontinued. Thereafter, perhaps due to its rarity, it captured the imagination of many, and became a regular feature on collectors' wish lists, which, in turn led to it being copied many more times than it had ever been made.

Little is known of the history of 668 VMB, except that the previous owner owned it from at least 1988 before it was purchased by the vendor's deceased spouse in 1995, but it certainly has all the hallmark looks of the RGS model. It has not been run, or used on the road, in the present ownership, only being taken to occasional shows, and will therefore require re-commissioning and safety checks before returning to the road with a new owner.

Documentation consists of a current V5C document, together with a quantity of receipts/invoices, various letters and articles relating to the model, an old MoT certificate, and sundry papers.